From 1964 to 1987 William Morris Meredith served as Chancellor of the Academy of American Poets.
He served as a fighter pilot in both the Pacific campaign in World War II and in Korea. From, 1946 to 1950, he was
Instructor in English at Princeton University, as the Woodrow Wilson Fellow in Writing, and Resident Fellow in
Creative Writing, then associate professor at the University of Hawaii (1950–51). After the Korean War he was
associate then Full Professor of English at Connecticut College, where he taught until 1983.

From 1978 to 1980, he was Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress of the United States,
the position which in 1985 became the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress.
 
Click on the image below to view the 2007 CT Governor's Lifetime Achievement Award for William Meredith.
Click on the image below for a video tour of the William Meredith Foundation.
The William Meredith Foundation and Center for the Arts

Contact:

Foundation Director:
Richard Harteis
Tel. (860) 961-5138
marathonfilm@gmail.com
www.WilliamMeredithFoundation.org and www.Poets-Choice.com

The William Meredith Foundation is about to begin a fund raising effort to celebrate the centennial anniversary of William Meredith's birth in 2019.
Setsuko Ono and the Washington Sculpture Group
A 30 minute film covering the life of our friend Setsuko Ono was aired by Nippon Television in Japan on August 3rd, 2016.
This video was taken by Nippon Television at WSG Sculpture Salon in June 2016:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/6msegpukzml9sj4/Studio%20Ono%20subtitles.mov?dl=0

Bulgaria TV News coverage of scattering of William Meredith's ashes. September, 2016.
 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LITERATURE
ABOUT THE WILLIAM MEREDITH FOUNDATION
A visit to the Two Trees Garden where William's ashes lie.

The William Meredith Foundation is proud to announce the establishment of the William Meredith Center for the Arts to remember and honor a great American spirit. Friends who have come together as a foundation wish never to forget this extraordinary human being and the impact he has had on so many lives. Poet, pilot, arborist, beloved teacher and friend, his legacy is a treasure we wish to pass on to future generations. The Meredith Center will keep the flame of generosity and artistic camaraderie burning at Riverrun, William's home on the Thames River in Connecticut where he lived and worked for 60 years and which has recently been added to the State Registry of Historic Landmarks.

The center sponsors educational programs during the year to provide cultural enrichment through a diverse selection of artistic programming. It fosters an appreciation for the work of local and regional artists and develops artist exchange programs internationally as well, particularly with the Republic of Bulgaria where Mr. Meredith was made a citizen by presidential decree for his work in the culture. Artists invited for residencies at the Meredith Center share their talents through art exhibitions, readings, publications and academic seminars. The center serves as a retreat where artists can create new works in the same spirit of peace, equality, and serious endeavor that characterized William's life and work at Riverrun.

First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote a letter joining Connecticut College in a celebration of William's 80th birthday in which she says, "The arts have always been a unifying force in our world, bringing people together across vast cultural, social, economic and geographical divisions. Through his work, William Meredith both enhances and strengthens the American spirit. As you honor Mr. Meredith, you celebrate the timeless power of poetry and poets as our American memory, our purveyors of insight and culture, our eyes and ears who silence the white noise around us, and express the very heart of what connects us, plagues us, and makes us fully human."

The William Meredith Center for the Arts offers another window on the world through which we can enhance our spirit, a window through which artists may search their private worlds and speak for us as we make our slow progress as members of the human tribe. A short signature poem by William Meredith inspires us in our efforts to honor his memory as a model of courage, good will, civility and achievement:

A Major Work

Poems are hard to read
Pictures are hard to see
Music is hard to hear
And people are hard to love

But whether from brute need
Or divine energy
At last mind eye and ear
And the great sloth heart will move.

Printable brochure for the William Meredith Foundation (pdf)